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TigerSharks Swim Team Registration Form

Both new and returning swimmers can register here for the 2018 swim season!

This online system will give you access to your own private account allowing online sign ups for meets, volunteer opportunities, access to swimmers' times, and more. 

The 2018 TigerShark Summer League season runs from May 21 - July 14 for swimmers ages 4 - 18 years old. 



Parent/Guardian Information

At least one parent/guardian registration is required.
New accounts will be sent an email confirmation message with instructions to setup a password.

At least one parent/guardian email address must be provided.
Check the boxes to indicate which parent/guardians should receive team-wide emails.

First Name * Last Name * Email Address *
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Primary Phone

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Athlete Information

Enter the information for each athlete being registered below. At least one Athlete registration is required.

First Name * Preferred Name Middle Initial Last Name * Gender * Birth Date *
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Home Address

Waiver

In consideration of being permitted to use the Fowler Center Pool and to take part in the TigerSharks Swim Team program, I release, discharge, and hold harmless the University of the South, its governing boards, employees, swim coaches, and assistants from all liability, claims, and injuries that my child(ren) may sustain during swim team, and on and around the pool locker rooms. We, the lesson instructors, coaches, and assistants, will take reasonable precautions to safeguard the child(ren) while they participate in the activities. These will include: supervised instruction sessions, establishment and enforcement of adequate rules and regulations according to the Fowler Center Pool and qualified staff of instructors (Lifeguards and/or Water Safety Instructors).

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Pool & Practice Rules

The pool balcony will be open for observation during swim practice.

Parents/Guardians may NOT stay on the pool deck unless requested by the staff, or to assist children in the locker room.

All swimmers MUST change downstairs in the locker rooms and equipment should be taken down to the deck with swimmers. Changing is not allowed in the upstairs lobby bathrooms and equipment should not be left in the lobby.

Per facility rules, children who remain in the Fowler Center before and after practices should be supervised by a parent or guardian. 

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Meet Attendance

We strongly encourage swimmers to attend all meets but also understand that schedule do not always allow this. It is important for coaches to know as far in advance as possible which swimmers will not be attending a meet, as this impacts how both individual and relay events are determined. You can indicate that your swimmer(s) will not be attending a particular meet from the Calendar section of this website. Swimmer(s) MUST "opt in" for each meet on-line and talk to their coach to confirm that they are swimming in the meet. 

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Volunteer Expectations

Swimmers, families, and the entire TigerSharks team benefit from the involvement of families during the season. Families are responsible for volunteering a minimum of 4 times per swim season, with at least 2 of these volunteer sessions being fulfilled at swim meets. It's fun to be involved! Most volunteer opportunities take place immediately before, during, or after swim meets, but other volunteer opportunities involve social events. A list of volunteer job descriptions can be found on this website in the Parent Resources section.

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Permission to Use Photographs

We hope that one or more parents and other community members will take photos during meets and other team activities. With parental permission, some of these may be shared with newspapers and/or on this team website.  

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest Information and Acknowledgement

What is sudden cardiac arrest?
Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is when the heart stops beating, suddenly and unexpectedly. When this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. SCA doesn’t just happen to adults; it takes the lives of students, too. However, the causes of sudden cardiac arrest in students and adults can be different. A youth athlete’s SCA will likely result from an inherited condition, while an adult’s SCA may be caused by either inherited or lifestyle issues. SCA is NOT a heart attack. A heart attack may cause SCA, but they are not the same. A heart attack is caused by a blockage that stops the flow of blood to the heart. SCA is a malfunction in the heart’s electrical system, causing the heart to suddenly stop beating.


How common is sudden cardiac arrest in the United States?
SCA is the #1 cause of death for adults in this country. There are about 300,000 cardiac arrests outside hospitals each year. About 2,000 patients under 25 die of SCA each year. It is the #1 cause of death for student athletes.


Are there warning signs?
Although SCA happens unexpectedly, some people may have signs or symptoms, such as:

  • fainting or seizures during exercise;
  • unexplained shortness of breath;
  • dizziness;
  • extreme fatigue;
  • chest pains; or
  • racing heart.

These symptoms can be unclear in athletes, since people often confuse these warning signs with physical exhaustion. SCA can be prevented if the underlying causes can be diagnosed and treated.


What are the risks of practicing or playing after experiencing these symptoms?
There are risks associated with continuing to practice or play after experiencing these symptoms. When the heart stops, so does the blood that flows to the brain and other vital organs. Death or permanent brain damage can occur in just a few minutes. Most people who experience SCA die from it.


Public Chapter 325 – the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Prevention Act
The act is intended to keep youth athletes safe while practicing or playing. The requirements of the act are:

  • All youth athletes and their parents or guardians must read and sign this form. It must be returned to the school before participation in any athletic activity. A new form must be signed and returned each school year.
  • The immediate removal of any youth athlete who passes out or faints while participating in an athletic activity, or who exhibits any of the following symptoms:

(i) Unexplained shortness of breath;
(ii) Chest pains;
(iii) Dizziness
(iv) Racing heart rate; or
(v) Extreme fatigue; and

  • Establish as policy that a youth athlete who has been removed from play shall not return to the practice or competition during which the youth athlete experienced symptoms consistent with sudden cardiac arrest

Before returning to practice or play in an athletic activity, the athlete must be evaluated by a Tennessee licensed medical doctor or an osteopathic physician. Clearance to full or graduated return to practice or play must be in writing.

Adapted from PA Department of Health: Sudden Cardiac Arrest Symptoms and Warning Signs Information Sheet and Acknowledgement of Receipt and Review Form. 7/2013


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Concussion Information

What is a concussion?
A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works. A concussion is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head or body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung” or what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head can be serious. 


Did You Know? 

  • Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness.
  • Athletes who have, at any point in their lives, had a concussion have an increased risk for another concussion. 
  • Young children and teens are more likely to get a concussion and take longer to recover than adults. 


What are the signs and symptoms of concussion?
Signs and symptoms of concussion can show up right after the injury or may not appear or be noticed until days or weeks after the injury. If an athlete reports one or more symptoms of concussion listed below after a bump, blow or jolt to the head or body, s/he should be kept out of play the day of the injury and until a health care provider* says s/he is symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play.

Signs Observed by Coaching StaffSymptoms Reported by Athletes
Appears dazed or stunned Headache or “pressure” in head
Is confused about assignment or positionNausea or vomiting
Forgets an instruction Balance problems or dizziness
Is unsure of game, score, or opponent Double or blurry vision
Moves clumsily Sensitivity to light
Answers questions slowly Sensitivity to noise
Loses consciousness, even briefly Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy or groggy
Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes Concentration or memory problems
Can’t recall events prior to hit of fall Confusion
Can’t recall events after hit of fall 

Just not “feeling right” or “feeling down”

“Health care provider” means a Tennessee licensed medical doctor, osteopathic physician, clinical neuropsychologist with concussion training, or physician assistant with concussion training who is a member of a health care team supervised by a Tennessee licensed medical doctor or osteopathic physician.


Concussion Danger Signs
In rare cases, a dangerous blood clot may form on the brain in a person with a concussion and crowd the brain against the skull. An athlete should receive immediate medical attention if after a bump, blow or jolt to the head or body if s/he exhibits any of the following danger signs: 

  • One pupil larger than the other
  • Is drowsy or cannot be awakened
  • A headache that not only does not diminish, but gets worse
  • Weakness, numbness or decreased coordination 
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea 
  • Slurred speech 
  • Convulsions or seizures 
  • Cannot recognize people or places 
  • Becomes increasingly confused, restless or agitated 
  • Has unusual behavior 
  • Loses consciousness (even a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously)


Why should an athlete report his or her symptoms? 
If an athlete has a concussion, his/her brain needs time to heal. While an athlete’s brain is still healing, s/he is much more likely to have another concussion. Repeat concussions can increase the time it takes to recover. In rare cases, repeat concussions in young athletes can result in brain swelling or permanent damage to their brain. They can even be fatal.


Remember: Concussions affect people differently. While most athletes with a concussion recover quickly and fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks. A more serious concussion can last for months or longer.


What should you do if you think your athlete has a concussion?
If you suspect that an athlete has a concussion, remove the athlete from play and seek medical attention. Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care provider* says s/he is symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play. Rest is key to helping an athlete recover from a concussion. Exercising or activities that involve a lot of concentration such as studying, working on the computer or playing video games, may cause concussion symptoms to reappear or get worse. After a concussion, returning to sports and school is a gradual process that should be carefully managed and monitored by a health care professional. 

* “Health care provider” or "health care professional" means a Tennessee licensed medical doctor, osteopathic physician, clinical neuropsychologist with concussion training, or physician assistant with concussion training who is a member of a health care team supervised by a Tennessee licensed medical doctor or osteopathic physician.



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A concussion is a brain injury, which should be reported to my parents, my coach(es) or a medical professional if one is available.
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A concussion cannot be “seen.” Some symptoms might be present right away. Other symptoms can show up hours or days after an injury.
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I will tell my parents, my coach and/or a medical professional about my injuries and illnesses.
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I will not return to play in a game or practice if a hit to my head or body causes any concussion-related symptoms.
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I will/my child will need written permission from a health care provider* to return to play or practice after a concussion.

*“Health care provider” means a Tennessee licensed medical doctor, osteopathic physician, clinical neuropsychologist with concussion training, or physician assistant with concussion training who is a member of a health care team supervised by a Tennessee licensed medical doctor or osteopathic physician.

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Most concussions take days or weeks to get better. A more serious concussion can last for months or longer.
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After a bump, blow or jolt to the head or body, an athlete should receive immediate medical attention if there are any danger signs such as loss of consciousness, repeated vomiting or a headache that gets worse.
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After a concussion, the brain needs time to heal. I understand that I am/my child is much more likely to have another concussion or more serious brain injury if return to play or practice occurs before the concussion symptoms go away.
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Sometimes repeat concussion can cause serious and long-lasting problems and even death.
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I have read the concussion symptoms in the Concussion Information section above.
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